Impressions and Reach

How do “impressions” differ from “reach”?

Impressions measure the number of times your post or ad appears to users. It makes an “impression” on a viewer but this metric doesn’t take into account unique users. That means that if the same person views it 20 times it counts as 20 impressions.

The metric of “reach” measures the number of unique users who view your post or ad. In that same situation the 20 views by one person would count as a reach of only one.

Here’s a post on blog.hubspot.com that focuses on how both metrics work on Instagram.

 

Even a Personal Site Can Sell

I feel bad for Tim Berners Lee (best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web) who has said that one thing he did not anticipate was how quickly the World Wide Web would become a marketplace.

Tim (who is currently a professor of computer science at the University of Oxford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology) reminds us that in those early days personal websites dominated.

But not everything on the web is commercial. Most blogs are personal, or at least not commercial. But some personal websites have become “commercial.”

I’m not thinking of ones that may have some Google or Amazon ads. I’m thinking of ones that contain personal thoughts and images but are also “selling” the owner as a brand.

This website is my personal website, but it does work to sell me. I have another sample blog that is really part of my web design business because it acts as an example of using a free site like Blogger to build an inexpensive website.

Blogs work well as websites because when you are consistently publishing on a blog you are likely to attract attention on social media and search engines and gain followers.

How often is consistent? I have read that commercial blogs that publish more than 16 posts per month get more than three times the traffic of blogs that published less than 4 posts per month. So, that’s a recommendation of about every other day or 4 times per week.

This is Melanie Daveid‘s portfolio features a selection of imagery from her best campaigns and apps. Is it personal? Yes. But it’s also commercial as it sells her, though not any actual product.

blog.hubspot.com has some best personal website samples and some best practices for personal, as in portfolio, websites. For example, using lots of visuals (even if your brand includes written work) including logos and other branding.

A personal site should be personal – i.e. it should show viewers your personality, style, maybe even your sense of humor, if that is part of what you are selling.

Simplicity should reign when it comes to organization. A main menu with just a few categories that perhaps subdivide into more granular pages after visitors land on the main page is a good navigation plan.

Brand Ambassadors

I received an offer recently to become a “brand ambassador” for a product line. The company is owned by someone who is an acquaintance and knew I had a background in social media marketing. Boosting brand awareness by using celebrities, customers and employees is becoming more and more common.

Though customers and employees may not have the audience and followers of a celebrity, they may have more believability as a spokesperson, especially if they are not being paid to endorse (which is what celebrities have been doing for a lot longer than there has been social media).

When you officially make some a brand ambassador, you should not just let them go on their own.

Most brands will create clear guidelines as to what they can post. A bad post can do a lot of damage.

You would need to create and curate relevant content for them. Images, logos, and text can be provided with guidelines how how much personalization and variation can be done.

I did this kind of campaign with a large national professional organization. The official but “unpaid” ambassadors who completed a series of campaign tasks around a national conference could get all or a portion of their conference stay covered. It was a good motivator.

Employers will often use a platform like Hootsuite or Smarp to facilitate employee engagement and advocacy by providing an internal content management system. Employees can access shareable content and schedule posts.

Customers – who are generally unpaid and unofficial ambassadors – can also be effective. As in my own experiences, when someone retweets or shares your official post they are endorsing (unless they make a negative comment along with that share!). That kind of 1:1 or 1:many word of mouth promotion is very powerful.

You’ll see offers made in this vein. For example, retweet this to your followers with a special hashtag and the company will select 10 retweets to win a product package.

So, You Want to Be a Social Media Manager

two people in a discussion with mobile phones

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

You see ads for the position of Social Media Manager. You use social media every day.  Maybe you’re no designer or marketing expert, but could you be an SM Manager?

What are the job responsibilities? Of course, that varies based on the employer, but here’s a quick list of some common parts of the job.

  • Work with content creators, possibly a content manager, public relations and marketing teams. If this is a small organization, you might be a one or two-person “department” and some knowledge of photography, videography, image editing skills is a real plus.
  • Develop a social media strategy
  • Manage all social media tactics to leverage content, drive community engagement and ultimately increase key KPIs.
  • Probably you will manage the social media budget
  • You will capture quantitative metrics and provide analysis and insights using SM management and analytical tools (Salesforce, Hootsuite etc.) for listening, scheduling, engaging, and reporting.
  • Manage the social media content calendar
  • For that job interview and when in the position you will need to stay up to date
    on your industry, especially the social media trends of competitors.

Do you need a college degree? Depends on the employer. Some may accept previous SM experience in a company – not personal social media experiences, though that certainly will help you. There are very few people in social media with degrees in social media because there are very few social media degrees though there are related fields such as marketing.

You certainly need experience managing social media or relevant, digital marketing experience across social media channels including Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest.

Is Social Media Hurting My Web Design Business?

That headline caught my attention (which is the purpose of a headline) because my business is both web design and social media.

“Social media is an interesting thing. As web design professionals, it can be a great opportunity to share your work and get in front of prospects who might otherwise never find you online. But for as much good as social media can do to propel your marketing efforts, it has the potential to be just as harmful to your business.”

But it turns out that the author is referring to how my social media presence could hurt my chances of getting a new job or client.

70% of hiring organizations research candidates using social media, and 57% of hiring managers have chosen not to pursue a candidate because of what they found on social media. So, I guess I need to watch what I say on social media. maybe I should avoid social media altogether. No[e, that’s not a good idea because 47% of organizations won’t contact a candidate if they have no online presence.

So, it’s a mixed message. Use social media the wrong way, and prospective clients will rule you out, but don’t use social media at all and they will also rule you out.

 

Who Is Abandoning Facebook?

access application browser connection

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

  • A new survey of more than 3,400 U.S. Facebook users finds that 44 percent of users ages 18 to 29 have deleted the app from their phones in the past year.
  • Overall, 26 percent have deleted the app.
  • 42 percent have taken a break of several weeks or more.

But what the survey does not measure may be just as significant.

  1. How many of those who left have switched to Facebook’s Instagram, WhatsApp or Messenger as their preferred communication channel?  All of those Facebook-owned alternatives are popular, especially outside the U.S.
  2. How many who left decided to come back to Facebook after some time off?  Facebook makes it a bit difficult to just delete an account Sort of like trying to drop your cable provider or a credit card.

Source: Facebook exodus…