Retiring Fonts

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Did you know that a font can retire? Adobe retired a group of fonts from their subscription library recently.

Font retirement may happen for a variety of reasons, but is typically at the request of the foundry, when a typeface is no longer available for licensing and distribution. The majority of font retirements are because the font family has been updated with significant changes that necessitate replacing it with an entirely new family. For example, Alverata PE from TypeTogether was overhauled, retired, and replaced by the family Alverata.

If a site is already using a retired font, it’ll continue to display, but once you change the font, you can’t go back to using the retired font.

Here’s a list of the retired ones:
Chemist
Chemist Rough
Couture
Couture Sans
Daniel
Fanwood Text
Intruder Alert
Junction
League Script No 1
Lobster
Luxi Sans
Luxi Serif
Molengo
New Cicle
Nobile
Prociono
Puritan
saxMono
Silkscreen
Simply Mono
Vera Sans

More at https://helpx.adobe.com/fonts/using/retired-fonts.html#what

Type, Typefaces and Fonts

Everyone online knows the term “font” but or designers there are important differences between type, typeface, and font.

Type is the generic term for everything that goes into visual text. Historically, the term  referred to the actual pieces of wood or metal used to create physical letters on printed pages. When designers talk about typography, they are discussing the style and appearance of printed text. Some designers actually specialize in typography in the design and arrangement of text visually.

Typeface, or font family, is the A-Z alphabet designed so that all the letters and symbols have similar features. This is what we mean when we say For instance, Times, Arial, or Helvetica.

Font is the term used to refer to the specific style of a typeface. Arial Black is a font of the Arial typeface.

Designing websites requires considerations of all three terms. rarely will a website use one font throughout.

If you want to divide font styles into two groups, it would be serif and sans serif. The serif is the small line at the end of a stroke on a letter. Calibri is a sans (without) serif font, while Cambria is a serif font.

Some fonts that are quite readable on a printed full-size poster are inappropriate on a screen. And of course, a phone screen and a laptop screen are different pieces of real estate.

Designers generally look to find and use fonts that complement each other. One approach is to use multiple fonts belonging to one family so that you have bold, italic, light, medium, and black options to use. Different fonts from within the same family can break up the text and draw attention while still being complementary.

Adobe adds fonts to their Typekit library and there are names that you have probably never seen as options in common applications like Microsoft Office. Check out BlambotChandler Van De Water, EuropaType and MAC Rhino Fonts as examples.

MORE

theblog.adobe.com/whats-in-a-font-how-fonts-can-define-your-design/

thenextweb.com/dd/2017/03/31/science-behind-fonts-make-feel/